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State of the Reef Report 2003: Indigenous connections with the Great Barrier Reef

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Title: State of the Reef Report 2003: Indigenous connections with the Great Barrier Reef
Year of publication: 2003
Publisher: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
Townsville
Type of document: Report
Series/Report no.: State of the Reef Report
Abstract: For over 60,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have been part of the unique living maritime culture of the Great Barrier Reef region. Today more than 50 Traditional Owner groups live along the coast and islands from Bundaberg to Cape York Peninsula, and on to the islands of the Torres Strait. Their traditional customs and spiritual lore continue to be practiced today in the utilisation of their sea country areas and natural resources. Due to their very long association with the region, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have acquired a vast knowledge of the marine environment, marine animals, their habitats and their lifestyles (Gray and Zann 1988; Benzaken, Smith et al. 1997). Resources from the sea, like those on the mainland, are utilised for different purposes. They have distinct cultural uses and are not only a commodity but a necessity for some communities.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11017/670
Connection to GBRMPA: GBRMPA published this item
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